Jonkersberg1

Hikers:- Sandy Louw, Di Turner, Bill Turner, Karin V Niekerk, Werner Frei, Janet Moore, Elaine Smith, Wolf Schneider, Brian Anderson, Tori Anderson, Hans V Ameyde, Clive Louw, Irmela Kohlsdorf, Greg Devine, Cheryl Devine, Greg Moore.
Dave Barnes, leader.
All of the above are members, with Brian and Tori Anderson being applicants.

The weather was ideal, a mild autumn day, and the forest light quite unique in patches.
The first part of the hike follows the Terblans trail, then the escape route from the Outeniqua from the Rondebossie hut.
Conditions were ideal to the battered beacon, so named because it has been removed from its placement and bent and battered beyond recognition. More proof, if ever needed, that man and baboon have a common ancestor.
After the battered beacon the path leaves the Outeniqua trail, following a ridge to the summit of Jonkersberg. This section was overgrown and hard going. In 2013 it had been cleared, and was easy going. It is amazing how the dodder has virtually closed the path in the intervening time. Afrikaans words often have unique descriptive abilities. The word for dodder, duiwelsnaaigaring, is such an example. Too high to be stepped over, the dodder had to be physically broken, the strands across the path being concentrated at about knee height. It was some exercise to reach the summit!

Jonkersberg2

Dodder – duiwelsnaaigaring

Unfortunately at the summit there was further evidence of supreme idiocy. The solar panels powering the radio repeater had been smashed after vandals were seemingly unable to dismantle the supporting frame.

The views made up for the dodder bashing. From Cradock to beyond Formosa, and to the Swartberg and Kamanassie there were clear views.
The total distance of the hike is 15.5 km, 5,5 hours.

Dave Barnes – meet leader

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